Is peer-review best left to academic journals?

Challenging the Conventional Narrative, fisheries, policy, Science, Science LifeJuly 21, 2015 • 1~2 min read

If you have ever dealt with scientific data, you’ve probably encountered one of the shadier sides of science: academic publishing. While they’ve stood, in some cases, for centuries, as the official record of scientific advancement safeguarded under the watchful eye of peers, modern journals live in a modern world. Millions of words have already been […]

Did Wyoming really just outlaw citizen science?

Citizen Science, policyMay 11, 2015 • 2~2 min read

I first heard about the new Wyoming law #SF0012 through the Slate article summarizing it as a criminalization of citizen science. There’s a real danger that it could be interpreted and implemented that way, but let’s try and give Wyoming the benefit of the doubt for a minute. The text of the law only requires […]

You say you need to incorporate the social sciences? Which kind?

Basics of the Human Dimension, Conservation, Science, Social ScienceApril 22, 2015 • 2~2 min read

This post in the second of a series entitled “The Basics of the Human Dimensions”, which gives the most basic tips for how to work with social scientists and social questions in marine conservation efforts. Whether you are the stakeholder, the collaborating natural scientist, or both, this series will hopefully make the journey into the human […]

What Conservationists Need to Know About Surveys

Science, Social ScienceApril 2, 2015 • 1~2 min read

This post in the first of a new series entitled “The Basics of the Human Dimensions”, which gives the most basic tips for how to work with social scientists and social questions in marine conservation efforts. Whether you are the stakeholder, the collaborating natural scientist, or both, this series will hopefully make the journey into […]

The disastrous feedback of what happens when fisheries funding dries up

Aquaculture in NC, Conservation, Environmentalism, fisheries, fisheries, Highlighting the Rural VoiceMarch 20, 2015 • 1~2 min read

Last week I had the good fortune of attending the NC Oyster Summit, hosted  by the NC Coastal Federation in the Museum of Natural Sciences. We talked about the wonders that oyster restoration and aquaculture development can do for water quality, economic development, and taste buds. We enjoyed the demonstration of ‘merriore’, or the taste […]

The words we use matter in climate change adaptation

UncategorizedJanuary 17, 2015 • 3~5 min read

In 2012, North Carolina outlawed climate change, receiving major press as the face of conservative climate policy. The intent of the law was to stop planning processes from basing their decisions on modeled climate change scenarios of the future, which would halt large investments in coastal development. But the letter of the law actually outlawed […]

Forest Service Wants Commercial Photography Out of its Wilderness

Conservation, Environmentalism, policySeptember 26, 2014 • 2~2 min read

Ansel Adams helped create what we now call American wilderness through his skillful photography – both his photographs and the places he used them to protect are national treasures. Recently, many of us were reminded of our country’s wilderness legacy through celebrations of the 50th anniversary of the Wilderness Act. For a quick reminder, the […]

Connecting the Town and Gown: Cooperative Extension

Challenging the Conventional Narrative, Focus on Nuance, UncategorizedJuly 31, 2014 • 1~2 min read

Over the last few months, I’ve seen a few efforts proposed to better connect universities to local community research needs. While whole practices and skill sets around participatory action research, community-based research, etc., exist, these don’t quite meet the need these recent proposals attempt to address. These proposals are not talking one faculty research program implementing […]

Education and Experience are Not Mutually Exclusive: Job Market Pet Peeves

Focus on Nuance, Life in the Lab, Personal Stories, Science LifeJuly 22, 2014 • 1~2 min read

While looking at positions that allow me to jump off the sinking ship of academia, I’ve seen plenty of rewarding, fun, and excitingly challenging job announcements out there. Most of them require two to five years of experience in the field, and I’ve looked at those, said ‘yep, I qualify’, and turned in the application. […]

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