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Core Themes for 2012

Is peer-review best left to academic journals?

Challenging the Conventional Narrative, fisheries, policy, Science, Science LifeJuly 21, 20150

If you have ever dealt with scientific data, you’ve probably encountered one of the shadier sides of science: academic publishing. While they’ve stood, in some cases, for centuries, as the official record of scientific advancement safeguarded under the watchful eye of peers, modern journals live in a modern world. Millions of words have already been […]

The disastrous feedback of what happens when fisheries funding dries up

Aquaculture in NC, Conservation, Environmentalism, fisheries, fisheries, Highlighting the Rural VoiceMarch 20, 2015

Last week I had the good fortune of attending the NC Oyster Summit, hosted  by the NC Coastal Federation in the Museum of Natural Sciences. We talked about the wonders that oyster restoration and aquaculture development can do for water quality, economic development, and taste buds. We enjoyed the demonstration of ‘merriore’, or the taste […]

Unhappy feet – why we need more than a day of penguin awareness

climate change, Conservation, marine science, Natural Science, Science, Social Science, Underrepresented Issues in Marine Science and ConservationJanuary 22, 2015

A couple of days ago (20th January) was penguin awareness day1. But do we really need to be more aware of penguins?  Well, actually yes.  Photo by Chris Parsons  We conducted a study a couple of years ago  (pdf also available) to look at public awareness of penguins (using university students as a sample) and […]

Ocean Things to Be Thankful For: Megalodon is Dead, but We Still Have Sharks (and Whales)

A Renewed Sense of Wonder, Conservation, Environmentalism, evolutionNovember 26, 2014

This time of year, it’s appropriate to think of things to be thankful for.  This being an ocean-focused blog, I’d like to share something ocean-related that I’m thankful for, and hopefully spread a little Ocean Optimism in the process.  What I’m thankful for is that Carcharocles megalodon is extinct.  This may not seem like cause […]

More large sharks were killed by recreational anglers than commercial fishermen in the U.S. last year

Conservation, Core Themes for 2012, Environmentalism, fisheries, marine science, Natural Science, Science, sharks, Underrepresented Issues in Marine Science and ConservationOctober 29, 2014

The United States National Marine Fisheries Service just released the 2013 “fisheries of the United States” report. The extremely detailed report contains lots of important information on both recreational and commercial fisheries in U.S. waters, and I recommend giving it a thorough read. I noticed an interesting detail about the U.S. shark fishery, though. In 2013, more large (non-dogfish) sharks […]

Fin-Body Ratios for Smooth Dogfish – Depends on How You Slice It

Conservation, fisheries, Focus on Nuance, sharks, Sustainability, Underrepresented Issues in Marine Science and ConservationAugust 8, 2014

The 2010 Shark Conservation Act prohibits removal of fins at sea for all sharks landed in U.S. Waters, with a glaring exception for smooth dogfish, or smoothhound sharks.  In an effort to ensure that fishermen aren’t performing the cruel practice of throwing a still-living but finless shark overboard, a fin:body ratio of 12% for smooth […]

Connecting the Town and Gown: Cooperative Extension

Challenging the Conventional Narrative, Focus on Nuance, UncategorizedJuly 31, 2014

Over the last few months, I’ve seen a few efforts proposed to better connect universities to local community research needs. While whole practices and skill sets around participatory action research, community-based research, etc., exist, these don’t quite meet the need these recent proposals attempt to address. These proposals are not talking one faculty research program implementing […]

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