Category Archives:

Core Themes for 2012

Establishing Best Practices to Minimize Waste in a Conservation Genetics Lab

Conservation, Core Themes for 2012, Environmentalism, Focus on Nuance, Life in the Lab, Science, SustainabilityNovember 14, 2012

I am, among other things, a conservation geneticist. What that means is that I use the tools of molecular ecology and population genetics to make observations about species and populations in at-risk ecosystems, assess the status of anthropogenically disturbed populations, and generate data that has direct applications to conservation and management issues. Essentially, the only […]

Alberta, Canada is the proud owner of the largest man-made pyramid on the planet

Challenging the Conventional Narrative, Core Themes for 2012, ScienceOctober 16, 2012

Pharaoh Khufu must be rolling in his monumental grave. Since its construction in 2560 BC, the Great Pyramid of Giza stood as the largest man-made pyramid ever built*. For 3800 years, it held the title of the tallest man-made structure of any kind. It wasn’t until the Industrial Revolution that our buildings began dwarfing this wonder […]

Ethics, Interdisciplinarity, and the Institutional Review Board

History of Science, Life in the Lab, Social Science, Underrepresented Issues in Marine Science and ConservationOctober 1, 2012

Say your local Lions Club wants to hold a focus group to determine what the community thinks would be the best way to direct community service efforts? What if you, as a blog writer, want to survey your readership about their demographics? What if the local food group wants to stand in front of a […]

The importance of being Aquaman, or how to save the Atlantean from his briny fate

A Renewed Sense of Wonder, Aquaman, biology, Core Themes for 2012, ecology, evolution, marine science, Natural Science, Popular Culture, Science, Underrepresented Issues in Marine Science and ConservationJuly 30, 2012

Two weeks ago, I challenged the world to consider how the greatest hero in the DC Universe would fair if forced to survive in the real world. The result was a hypothermic, brain-dead lump of jerky with brittle bones forced to suffer through constant screams of agony even as he consumes sea life at a […]

Live from Dayton: Using twitter to shed light on the Scopes Monkey Trial, 87 years later

Core Themes for 2012, Focus on Nuance, History of Science, ScienceJuly 23, 2012

Over the last 2 weeks, I’ve taken to twitter to “live-tweet” the Scopes Monkey Trial, as it happens, 87 years after the event. Through the news reports of H.L. Mencken and several historical documents, I attempted to capture the atmosphere of 1925 Dayton, Tennessee, the tension of the trial, the exciting, and sometimes irreverent, nature of the […]

The horrifying physiological and psychological consequences of being Aquaman

A Renewed Sense of Wonder, Aquaman, Challenging the Conventional Narrative, Core Themes for 2012, Popular CultureJuly 18, 2012

Aquaman may not be everybody’s favorite superhero, but since his creation in 1941, he has been among DC’s most enduring icons. During the Golden Age of comic books, he held his own against Superman, Batman, and Wonder Woman. Silver Age Aquaman was a founding member of the Justice League. His powers, tied to the ocean, […]

Carnivorous plants respond to increased soil nitrogen, eco-news websites completely miss the point

biology, Core Themes for 2012, ecology, Environmentalism, Focus on Nuance, Natural Science, ScienceJune 10, 2012

Late last week, inspired by our newly flowering Venus Flytraps, I posted pictures of Amy and my carnivorous plant collection on twitter and on the Southern Fried Science Facebook page. After David’s recent post on a nurse shark that underwent major dietary changes following traumatic surgery and captivity, our wonderful readers must have been on high […]

False Fish, Pink Slime, and Dactylopius frappucoccus: food supply, food choices, and establishing a personal food ethic

Core Themes for 2012, Environmentalism, Focus on Nuance, SustainabilityMay 21, 2012

Food is a tricky. For some people, food choice is an essential component of cultural heritage and national identity. For others, food choice is a statement of philosophical or moral principles. For many, being able to reject food is an unobtainable luxury. One thing is certain: food is so central to the human experience that when we […]

Connect with SFS
  • Categorical Archives
    Chronological Archives

    Join 137 other subscribers