Category Archives:

evolution

Ocean Things to Be Thankful For: Megalodon is Dead, but We Still Have Sharks (and Whales)

A Renewed Sense of Wonder, Conservation, Environmentalism, evolutionNovember 26, 20140

This time of year, it’s appropriate to think of things to be thankful for.  This being an ocean-focused blog, I’d like to share something ocean-related that I’m thankful for, and hopefully spread a little Ocean Optimism in the process.  What I’m thankful for is that Carcharocles megalodon is extinct.  This may not seem like cause […]

Beyond the Edge of the Plume: understanding environmental impacts of deep-sea mining

biology, Conservation, deep sea, Environmentalism, evolution, marine science, Natural Science, ScienceJuly 21, 2014

The mining of deep-sea hydrothermal vents for gold, copper, and other precious metals, is imminent. Over the last seven years I’ve worked with industry, academia, and international regulatory agencies to help craft guidelines for conducting environmental impact studies and assess the connectivity and resilience of deep-sea ecosystems. Deep-sea mining, particularly at hydrothermal vents, is a […]

Eleven Marine Organisms that would make Amazing Aquaman Villains

Aquaman, biology, deep sea, ecology, evolution, marine science, Natural Science, Popular Culture, Science, sharksSeptember 19, 2013

Black Manta. Ocean Master. The Trench. Scavenger. King Shark. Toxin. The Fisherman. Aquaman has had some pretty memorable villains over the last 80 years. Also, the Fisherman. This is Southern Fried Science, a blog famous for two things – inspiring the world with our unique blend of marine science and conservation and doing horrible, horrible […]

The Sex Lives of Spoonworms: 10 marine animals with parasitic, dwarf, and otherwise reduced males

biology, deep sea, evolution, marine science, Natural Science, ScienceMay 31, 2013

Earlier this week, Fox News commentator and all-around terrific guy* Erick Erickson, while discussing a recent Pew Study that revealed that women were the sole breadwinners in 40% of US households that contain children, had this to say: “I’m so used to liberals telling conservatives that they’re anti-science. But liberals who defend this and say […]

Five more marine organisms that put their superhero counterparts to shame

biology, deep sea, ecology, evolution, marine science, Natural Science, Popular Culture, ScienceApril 17, 2013

Evolution is the most creative force on the planet. Everywhere we look, we find species with novel and phenomenal adaptations that put their comic book brethren to shame. In no ecosystem is this more apparent than in the vast and unfathomable ocean. Marine species, especially those in the deep sea, have evolved to survive in a […]

Five organisms with real super powers that rival their comic book counterparts

deep sea, ecology, evolution, Natural Science, Popular Culture, ScienceJanuary 2, 2013

There is no force more creative than the painstakingly slow process of evolution. Ever wanted to walk through walls? Naked mole rats can physically bore through concrete. How about fly? There are a couple dozen different ways to accomplish that goal, even if you’re a squid. Incredible power of regeneration? Flatworms, roundworms, and echinoderms have us beat. Among […]

The importance of being Aquaman, or how to save the Atlantean from his briny fate

A Renewed Sense of Wonder, Aquaman, biology, Core Themes for 2012, ecology, evolution, marine science, Natural Science, Popular Culture, Science, Underrepresented Issues in Marine Science and ConservationJuly 30, 2012

Two weeks ago, I challenged the world to consider how the greatest hero in the DC Universe would fair if forced to survive in the real world. The result was a hypothermic, brain-dead lump of jerky with brittle bones forced to suffer through constant screams of agony even as he consumes sea life at a […]

Genetics study reveals 79 potentially new species of sharks and rays: what does it mean for science and conservation?

Conservation, evolution, marine science, Natural Science, Science, sharksJuly 3, 2012

When Dr. Gavin Naylor and his team started a genetic survey of existing shark and ray species, they didn’t expect the results of their project to make international news.  Their recent paper (which, at over 250 pages and complete with more than 100 figures, is nothing short of epic), however, is too striking to ignore. […]

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