Category Archives:

ecology

Carnivorous plants respond to increased soil nitrogen, eco-news websites completely miss the point

biology, Core Themes for 2012, ecology, Environmentalism, Focus on Nuance, Natural Science, ScienceJune 10, 2012

Late last week, inspired by our newly flowering Venus Flytraps, I posted pictures of Amy and my carnivorous plant collection on twitter and on the Southern Fried Science Facebook page. After David’s recent post on a nurse shark that underwent major dietary changes following traumatic surgery and captivity, our wonderful readers must have been on high […]

Beneath the Broken Ice: Playing with Mud

biology, climate change, ecology, Life in the Lab, Natural Science, ScienceApril 18, 2012

Megumi Shimizu is a graduate student aboard the RVIB Nathaniel B. Palmer to collect sediment samples near Antarctic Peninsula as a part of the LARISSA project. She is interested in microorganisms and biogeochemistry of marine sediments; how the metabolism of microorganisms interact with the surrounding environment and the chemical components in sediments. See her first […]

Beneath the Broken Ice: Megumi Shimizu on the 2012 LARISSA Campaign to the Antarctic Peninsula

biology, climate change, ecology, Natural Science, ScienceMarch 12, 2012

Megumi Shimizu is a graduate student studying microorganisms in marine sediment. She is currently on board the RVIB Nathaniel B. Palmer exploring seafloor communities in a once ice-covered region beneath the Larsen Ice Shelf. Over the next month, she will be updating us from the field. I’m a PhD student interested in microorganisms and biogeochemistry […]

“Sharks create oxygen”: A scientific perspective

Conservation, ecology, marine science, Natural Science, Science, sharksFebruary 10, 2012

I want to apologize to our regular readers for stating something that should be incredibly obvious. Sharks in in no way connected to the global supply of atmospheric oxygen. If every single species of shark went extinct, there would be a variety of negative ecological effects, but a reduction in the global supply of atmospheric […]

Updates from the Deep: New and Noteworthy in Hydrothermal Vent Research

Conservation, deep sea, ecology, evolution, marine science, Natural Science, oceanography, ScienceJanuary 10, 2012

From hairy-chested yeti crabs to the deepest known fields, hydrothermal vents have been enjoying a bit of science celebrity in the last few weeks. Beneath the headlines, there has been an eruption of vent-related research published in the scientific literature and some exciting new expeditions just left port. The Discovery of New Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vent Communities in […]

That sinking feeling: Hog lagoons, superbugs, and the proliferation of antibiotics in livestock

agriculture, biology, ecology, evolution, Natural Science, ScienceJanuary 2, 2012

The murky brown water was still, reflecting, perfectly, the drifting clouds above. Had I not known what it was, an acre-wide manmade pond almost a dozen feet deep filled to the brim with hog feces, I might be tempted to describe it as “beautiful”. Hog lagoons like this are a common sight in North Carolina, […]

Better Conservation through Cloning: this cock doesn’t crow

biology, Conservation, ecology, evolution, Natural Science, ScienceDecember 7, 2011

I awoke one morning early last spring to a noise I has been dreading for weeks, the first crow of a chicken that was not supposed to be a rooster. It took me several minutes to fully register what I was hearing. Rather that the classic cock-a-doodle-do we often associate with the rooster’s crow, the sound emanating from my […]

Bluefin Tuna, Big Game Hunters, and the Conservation Vortex

biology, Conservation, ecology, fisheries, marine science, Natural Science, ScienceNovember 29, 2011

Why are we still killing Bluefin Tuna? This question has resonated through the ocean blogosphere recently, as various experts weigh the issues surrounding overfishing and wonder why, when we know how limited the Bluefin Tuna populations are, and how precipitously they’ve declined in the last decade, do they demand record-breaking prices able to support an industry […]

America’s lust for gigantic breasts leads to impotence: the population genetics of captive-reared turkeys

biology, Conservation, ecology, evolution, Natural Science, ScienceNovember 23, 2011

The noble turkey, a centerpiece of the American Thanksgiving supper. It looms large from its prominent position on the dining room table. The master of ceremonies – or, in my case, the guy who keeps slicing himself open with various sharp objects yet is inexplicably the one people call on when there’s knife-work needs doing […]

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