Category Archives:

biology

The Sex Lives of Spoonworms: 10 marine animals with parasitic, dwarf, and otherwise reduced males

biology, deep sea, evolution, marine science, Natural Science, ScienceMay 31, 2013

Earlier this week, Fox News commentator and all-around terrific guy* Erick Erickson, while discussing a recent Pew Study that revealed that women were the sole breadwinners in 40% of US households that contain children, had this to say: “I’m so used to liberals telling conservatives that they’re anti-science. But liberals who defend this and say […]

Five more marine organisms that put their superhero counterparts to shame

biology, deep sea, ecology, evolution, marine science, Natural Science, Popular Culture, ScienceApril 17, 2013

Evolution is the most creative force on the planet. Everywhere we look, we find species with novel and phenomenal adaptations that put their comic book brethren to shame. In no ecosystem is this more apparent than in the vast and unfathomable ocean. Marine species, especially those in the deep sea, have evolved to survive in a […]

The importance of being Aquaman, or how to save the Atlantean from his briny fate

A Renewed Sense of Wonder, Aquaman, biology, Core Themes for 2012, ecology, evolution, marine science, Natural Science, Popular Culture, Science, Underrepresented Issues in Marine Science and ConservationJuly 30, 2012

Two weeks ago, I challenged the world to consider how the greatest hero in the DC Universe would fair if forced to survive in the real world. The result was a hypothermic, brain-dead lump of jerky with brittle bones forced to suffer through constant screams of agony even as he consumes sea life at a […]

Carnivorous plants respond to increased soil nitrogen, eco-news websites completely miss the point

biology, Core Themes for 2012, ecology, Environmentalism, Focus on Nuance, Natural Science, ScienceJune 10, 2012

Late last week, inspired by our newly flowering Venus Flytraps, I posted pictures of Amy and my carnivorous plant collection on twitter and on the Southern Fried Science Facebook page. After David’s recent post on a nurse shark that underwent major dietary changes following traumatic surgery and captivity, our wonderful readers must have been on high […]

Beneath the Broken Ice: Playing with Mud

biology, climate change, ecology, Life in the Lab, Natural Science, ScienceApril 18, 2012

Megumi Shimizu is a graduate student aboard the RVIB Nathaniel B. Palmer to collect sediment samples near Antarctic Peninsula as a part of the LARISSA project. She is interested in microorganisms and biogeochemistry of marine sediments; how the metabolism of microorganisms interact with the surrounding environment and the chemical components in sediments. See her first […]

Beneath the Broken Ice: Megumi Shimizu on the 2012 LARISSA Campaign to the Antarctic Peninsula

biology, climate change, ecology, Natural Science, ScienceMarch 12, 2012

Megumi Shimizu is a graduate student studying microorganisms in marine sediment. She is currently on board the RVIB Nathaniel B. Palmer exploring seafloor communities in a once ice-covered region beneath the Larsen Ice Shelf. Over the next month, she will be updating us from the field. I’m a PhD student interested in microorganisms and biogeochemistry […]

That sinking feeling: Hog lagoons, superbugs, and the proliferation of antibiotics in livestock

agriculture, biology, ecology, evolution, Natural Science, ScienceJanuary 2, 2012

The murky brown water was still, reflecting, perfectly, the drifting clouds above. Had I not known what it was, an acre-wide manmade pond almost a dozen feet deep filled to the brim with hog feces, I might be tempted to describe it as “beautiful”. Hog lagoons like this are a common sight in North Carolina, […]

Better Conservation through Cloning: this cock doesn’t crow

biology, Conservation, ecology, evolution, Natural Science, ScienceDecember 7, 2011

I awoke one morning early last spring to a noise I has been dreading for weeks, the first crow of a chicken that was not supposed to be a rooster. It took me several minutes to fully register what I was hearing. Rather that the classic cock-a-doodle-do we often associate with the rooster’s crow, the sound emanating from my […]

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