Category Archives:

fisheries

Media coverage of the Yates Supreme Court case isn’t treating illegal fishing seriously

Conservation, fisheries, marine science, Natural Science, ScienceNovember 6, 20141

This week, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments for Yates vs. the United States. Commercial fishermen John Yates was caught with dozens of illegally caught grouper, he destroyed much of the evidence of this crime, and he was charged under a law designed to prosecute people for destruction of evidence. He is now suing the government […]

Progress: It’s now only legal to remove fins at sea for one shark species in the United States

Conservation, fisheries, marine science, Natural Science, Science, sharksNovember 3, 20140

Shark finning, the process of removing shark fins at sea and dumping the rest of the body, is nearly universally opposed by conservation activists, scientific researchers and fisheries managers. In addition to being potentially inhumane (the shark is often still alive when dumped overboard,) this processing method is exceptionally wasteful and makes it very difficult for […]

More large sharks were killed by recreational anglers than commercial fishermen in the U.S. last year

Conservation, Core Themes for 2012, Environmentalism, fisheries, marine science, Natural Science, Science, sharks, Underrepresented Issues in Marine Science and ConservationOctober 29, 20142

The United States National Marine Fisheries Service just released the 2013 “fisheries of the United States” report. The extremely detailed report contains lots of important information on both recreational and commercial fisheries in U.S. waters, and I recommend giving it a thorough read. I noticed an interesting detail about the U.S. shark fishery, though. In 2013, more large (non-dogfish) sharks […]

5 simple things you can do to improve U.S. shark and ray management

fisheries, marine science, Natural Science, Science, sharksAugust 16, 2014

Sonja Fordham founded Shark Advocates International as a project of The Ocean Foundation in 2010 based on her two decades of shark conservation experience at  Ocean Conservancy.  She is Deputy Chair of the IUCN Shark Specialist Group and Conservation Committee Chair for the American Elasmobranch Society, has co-authored numerous publications on shark fisheries management, and […]

Background information on our “trophy fishing for species threatened with extinction” paper

Conservation, fisheries, marine science, Natural Science, ScienceAugust 11, 2014

Andrew and I (along with several co-authors) have a new paper out in the journal Marine Policy entitled “Trophy Fishing for Species Threatened with Extinction: A way Forward Based on a History of Conservation.” You can read the paper here, and view the official press release here (will be up soon) . We believe that this is an important […]

Fin-Body Ratios for Smooth Dogfish – Depends on How You Slice It

Conservation, fisheries, Focus on Nuance, sharks, Sustainability, Underrepresented Issues in Marine Science and ConservationAugust 8, 2014

The 2010 Shark Conservation Act prohibits removal of fins at sea for all sharks landed in U.S. Waters, with a glaring exception for smooth dogfish, or smoothhound sharks.  In an effort to ensure that fishermen aren’t performing the cruel practice of throwing a still-living but finless shark overboard, a fin:body ratio of 12% for smooth […]

Frequently asked questions about Rosie O’Donnell killing an endangered shark for fun

fisheries, marine science, Natural Science, Science, sharksJuly 13, 2014

On Friday afternoon, Slate published an article I wrote about Rosie O’Donnell killing an endangered hammerhead shark. Since that time, there has been an active discussion about the article and the surrounding issues on twitter (follow me here) and Facebook (like my page here). Some of the same questions keep coming up, so I decided […]

Six reasons why Menhaden are the greatest fish we ever fished.

fisheries, marine science, Natural Science, ScienceMay 21, 2014

Menhaden, Brevoortia tyrannus, is, without a doubt, the single most important fish in the western Atlantic. This oily filter-feeder swims in schools so large that they block the sun from penetrating the water’s surface as it regulates ocean health. Earlier this week, we were greeted by news that menhaden stocks were rebounded, yet despite their near-universal importance in […]

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