Category Archives:

fisheries

Fun Science FRIEDay – “A cold-water fish with a warm heart!”

biology, evolution, fisheries, Fun Science Friday, marine science, Natural Science, UncategorizedMay 15, 20150

OPAH, OPAH, OPAH! Recently scientists at NOAA’s South West Fisheries Science Center made a stunning discovery, the worlds first known warm-blooded fish, the moonfish, opah  (Lampris guttatus). Until this recent discovery all fish were considered cold-blooded ectotherms – allowing their body temperature to fluctuate with the change in ambient ocean temperature. However, opah’s are different, in that these […]

Yoda, Yoga, and the Fish of Cannery Row

Blogging, Conservation, fisheries, marine science, Natural Science, ScienceApril 6, 2015

Stacy Aguilera is an Abess Fellow at the University of Miami. Her dissertation research focuses on why certain small-scale fisheries in California are relatively successful, from a social and ecological perspective. Follow her on Twitter here! As my favorite little green guy once said, “Difficult to see. Always in motion is the future.” Yoda may […]

A request to environmentalists and journalists discussing shark fin ban legislation

Blogging, fisheries, marine science, Natural Science, Science, sharksMarch 23, 2015

Many of the U.S. state-level shark fin bans which make it illegal to buy, sell, or possess shark fins include exemptions for smooth and spiny dogfish, i.e. by far the most common species of sharks caught by U.S. fishermen. Some of these fisheries have significant conservation concerns associated with them. Much of this fishing is not currently […]

The disastrous feedback of what happens when fisheries funding dries up

Aquaculture in NC, Conservation, Environmentalism, fisheries, fisheries, Highlighting the Rural VoiceMarch 20, 2015

Last week I had the good fortune of attending the NC Oyster Summit, hosted  by the NC Coastal Federation in the Museum of Natural Sciences. We talked about the wonders that oyster restoration and aquaculture development can do for water quality, economic development, and taste buds. We enjoyed the demonstration of ‘merriore’, or the taste […]

Snowy Owls and Goliath Groupers: Why I co-authored “Trophy fishing for species threatened with extinction.”

Blogging, Conservation, deep sea, Environmentalism, fisheries, marine science, Natural Science, Personal Stories, Science, SustainabilityJanuary 9, 2015

In both my professional and private life, I am a man who wears many hats. I am a deep-sea ecologist, a science writer, a goatherd, a geneticist, a conservation advocate, a grill master, and many others. When David asked me to join him in co-authoring “Trophy fishing for species threatened with extinction: A way forward building on […]

The era of the million-dollar tuna is over.

#OceanOptimism, Conservation, fisheries, marine science, Natural Science, ScienceJanuary 5, 2015

For the last several years, we’ve been following the first-of-the-year Tsukiji Tuna Auction. In the past, this auction has served as a (often questionable) benchmark for the demand for Bluefin Tuna. At its peak, the price of Bluefin Tuna broke the scales at nearly $1,800,000. As the price continued to inflate, last year we even released […]

No Endangered Listing for Dusky Sharks (and That’s a Good Thing)

Conservation, fisheries, sharks, SustainabilityDecember 16, 2014

Though the fisheries news cycle has mostly been taken up by the 15-year anniversary of the Sea Around Us project (and some choice words between researchers), today also marked the official announcement of the 12-month finding on the petition to list dusky sharks on the U.S. Endangered Species Act.  Long story short, the National Marine […]

Media coverage of the Yates Supreme Court case isn’t treating illegal fishing seriously

Conservation, fisheries, marine science, Natural Science, ScienceNovember 6, 2014

This week, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments for Yates vs. the United States. Commercial fishermen John Yates was caught with dozens of illegally caught grouper, he destroyed much of the evidence of this crime, and he was charged under a law designed to prosecute people for destruction of evidence. He is now suing the government […]

Progress: It’s now only legal to remove fins at sea for one shark species in the United States

Conservation, fisheries, marine science, Natural Science, Science, sharksNovember 3, 2014

Shark finning, the process of removing shark fins at sea and dumping the rest of the body, is nearly universally opposed by conservation activists, scientific researchers and fisheries managers. In addition to being potentially inhumane (the shark is often still alive when dumped overboard,) this processing method is exceptionally wasteful and makes it very difficult for […]

More large sharks were killed by recreational anglers than commercial fishermen in the U.S. last year

Conservation, Core Themes for 2012, Environmentalism, fisheries, marine science, Natural Science, Science, sharks, Underrepresented Issues in Marine Science and ConservationOctober 29, 2014

The United States National Marine Fisheries Service just released the 2013 “fisheries of the United States” report. The extremely detailed report contains lots of important information on both recreational and commercial fisheries in U.S. waters, and I recommend giving it a thorough read. I noticed an interesting detail about the U.S. shark fishery, though. In 2013, more large (non-dogfish) sharks […]

Connect with SFS
  • Categorical Archives
    Chronological Archives
    Subscribe via Email

    Join 188 other subscribers