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Life in the Lab

Surviving Grad School: Credit Cards, Reimbursement, and International Travel

Life in the Lab, ScienceApril 11, 2013

Reimbursements and International Travel Graduate school comes with several financial challenges that require planning and careful attention to details. Chief among these challenges are the two big wallet busters: university reimbursements and international travel. Often these two combine to form a deadly, money sucking hydra. You will inevitably need to pay for something – airline […]

Surviving Grad School: Credit, why it matters, how to build it, and how to use it

Life in the Lab, ScienceApril 10, 2013

Graduate school can be a financially volatile time. Grad students, often living on a low, fixed income, may find that they are required to shoulder unexpected expenses–new computers, travel for research, professional attire, not to mention the cost of relocating to a new area. Many graduate students arrive straight out of university, having never needed […]

The Incredible Shrinking Cups: Welcome to the Cayman Abyss

deep sea, Life in the Lab, marine science, Natural Science, ScienceApril 5, 2013

One of the great traditions among deep-sea scientists is the shrinking of polystyrene cups by sending them down to our research sites. Polystyrene (or Styrofoam) is mostly empty space. When sent to the bottom of the sea, the massive pressure (an additional atmosphere for every 10 meters depths) squeezes the air out of these empty spaces […]

Advice I Took For Granted For Grad School

Life in the LabMarch 28, 2013

Over dinner one cold winter night my last year as an undergraduate, my advisor casually mentioned that unless I was offered a stipend, it wasn’t really an acceptance into graduate school. This was specific to my case to a certain degree – looking for a PhD program in the environmental sciences – but his words […]

Return from the Cayman Abyss: cruise post-mortem and some thoughts on media coverage

deep sea, Life in the Lab, marine science, Natural Science, ScienceMarch 1, 2013

At 7 AM EST on Monday, February 25, the ROV Isis rose from the depths of the Cayman Abyss, bringing to a close the 82nd cruise of the RRS James Cook. During JC82, we explored two recently discovered hydrothermal vents fields in the Cayman Trough: Von Damm, named for the late marine geochemist Karen Von […]

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