554 words • 3~5 min read

Science in the Fleet: What would your hometown look like with 80 meters Sea Level Rise

UPDATE: These posts, and the hashtag are getting a lot of attention, so I’d like to reiterate, Caveat Tweetor (twitter beware) — these models are being generated on the fly as request come in. They are not validated and there are many variables that influence sea level rise which are not taken into account. This is a fun way to visualize potential sea level rise but it would be inadvisable to use it for real estate speculation. 

The central conceit in the world of Fleet–my dystopian maritime science fiction serial adventure–is that sea level has risen 80 meters, an extreme maximum projection under global climate change prediction (INSERT LINK TO USGS DATA HERE AFTER SHUTDOWN ENDS – UPDATE: Oh, neat, we have a federal government again. Here’s the source). Since 80 meters is pretty hard to visualize, I turned to Google Earth to help me simulate what our world would look like under those conditions, starting with my new residence in San Francisco:

FleetSanFran

San Francisco, 80 meters

Oh, but we’re not done yet.

Washington, DC, 80 meters

Washington, DC, 80 meters

Baltimore, 80 meters

Baltimore, 80 meters

New York, 80 meters

New York, 80 meters

Let’s zoom out a bit:

Bad News, Miami, 80 meters

Bad News, Miami, 80 meters

Good thing you outlawed sea level rise, North Carolina, 80 meters

Good thing you outlawed sea level rise, North Carolina, 80 meters

A view from the London Eye. 80 meters

A view from the London Eye. 80 meters

Sydney. Wet. 80 meters

Sydney. Wet. 80 meters

Port Moresby, Papue New Guinea. 80 meters

Port Moresby, Papue New Guinea. 80 meters

And I couldn’t resist my Planet of the Apes image!

Statue of Liberty, 80 meters

Statue of Liberty, 80 meters

Check out Fleet: The Reach and Fleet: Wide Open to experience a world in which people live with 80 meters of sea level rise.


Deep-sea biologist, population/conservation geneticist, backyard farm advocate. The deep sea is Earth's last great wilderness.


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