394 words • 3~4 min read

Ocean of Pseudoscience Shorty – Can methane bubbles sink ships?

One of the often cited causes for ships that mysteriously and quickly disappear are methane bubbles, released from sub-seafloor gas pockets. The story goes that as methane rises to the surface, the bubbles cause the density of seawater to drop, and any ships in the area suddenly lose buoyancy and spontaneously sink. This effect has been describe as so powerful that it can even knock aircraft out of the sky. Is it true? Can methane bubbles really sink ships?

The short answer is yes, under very specific conditions, but not in the way proposed. At least two studies have been conducted to determine if methane can really sink ships. In a static system with no current, a bubble that rises close to a ship, but not immediately underneath it, can force the ship into a trough created by the bubble, swamp it, and cause it to sink. If multiple bubbles are present in an unconfined system, as is likely in the ocean, ships do not sink.

So while it is conceivable that some sinkings could be caused by methane gas release, the conditions are so specific that it is unlikely that this phenomenon can account for all but a handful of disappearances.

~Southern Fried Scientist


ResearchBlogging.org

May, D., & Monaghan, J. (2003). Can a single bubble sink a ship? American Journal of Physics, 71 (9) DOI: 10.1119/1.1582187

Hueschen, M. (2010). Can bubbles sink ships? American Journal of Physics, 78 (2) DOI: 10.1119/1.3263819


Deep-sea biologist, population/conservation geneticist, backyard farm advocate. The deep sea is Earth's last great wilderness.


Connect with SFS


  • Recent Popular Articles

    Shark of Darkness: Wrath of Submarine is a fake documentary
    Megalodon: the New Evidence is a fake documentary
    More large sharks were killed by recreational anglers than commercial fishermen in the U.S. last year
    The greater good: animal welfare vs. conservation
    The Trouble with Teacup Pigs
    Severely injured great white shark found, are scientists responsible?
    Mermaids: The New Evidence is a Fake Documentary
    10 reasons why marine mammals aren't as cute as you think they are