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colin simpfendorfer

The science of shark control (and what it means for the Western Australia cull)

Blogging, Conservation, marine science, Natural Science, Science, sharksMarch 17, 2014

Prof Colin Simpfendorfer is the Director of the Centre for Sustainable Tropical Fisheries and Aquaculture at James Cook University. He has more than 25 years of experience in researching sharks, and has published extensively in the scientific literature on shark biology, ecology, fisheries and conservation. He is a graduate of James Cook University where he undertook […]

First systematic threat analysis reveals that 1/4 of sharks, rays, and chimaeras are threatened with extinction

Conservation, marine science, Natural Science, Science, sharksJanuary 21, 2014

It took a team of over 300 scientists nearly two decades, but the first systematic analysis of the conservation status of chondrichthyans (sharks, rays and chimaeras) has been completed. The results, published today (open access) in a paper titled “Extinction risk and conservation of the world’s sharks and rays,” are chilling. “Our unprecedented analysis shows that […]

Tweets from the American Elasmobranch Society: Deepwater Chondrichthyans Symposium

deep sea, marine science, Natural Science, Science, sharksAugust 18, 2012

The American Elasmobranch Society is a non-profit professional society focusing on the scientific study and conservation of sharks, skates, and rays. AES members meet each year in a different North American city, and this meeting is the world’s largest annual gathering of shark scientists. AES recently met in Vancouver, British Columbia for the 2012 meeting, […]

What hybrid sharks mean (and don’t mean) for climate change and evolution: fact-checking the media coverage

Conservation, fisheries, marine science, Natural Science, Science, sharksJanuary 6, 2012

Last week, a team of 10 Australian scientists announced that they had found the world’s first “shark hybrids”, offspring of individuals from two different shark species which had interbred. During a routine survey of Australian marine life, 57 sharks were found that physically resembled one species of shark, but had genetic markers inconsistent with that species. […]

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