1059 words • 5~8 min read

Bone-eating zombie worms, octopus overlords, old wooden ships and new woes for deep-sea mining. It’s the Monday Morning Salvage! January 1, 2018.

Fog Horn (A Call to Action)

  • Stop. Breathe. Take a step back. This can all be incredibly overwhelming. Pick the fight that matters most to you and take a few days deciding what success looks like, what strategies will work, and what tactics are available to you. And then hoist your flag and get to work.

  • And when you meet someone fighting a different fight, remember to support them. There are already enough fronts to advance without taking friendly fire from our flanks.

Flotsam (what we’re obsessed with right now)

The frilled giant Pacific octopus. Photo Courtesy D. Scheel

Jetsam (what we’re enjoying from around the web)

Image: Wikimedia

And finally, we morn the deaths of almost 200 environmental activists, killed in the line of duty defending the natural world against overwhelming odds. Farewell, friends, we’ll see you again on Fiddler’s Green.

Lagan (what we’re reading from the peer-reviewed literature)

I haven’t been great about sharing PhD and Master’s theses among the lagan but they deserve recognition to, so here’s one I found useful last week:

Shipping News (academic and ocean policy wonkery)

Driftwood (what we’re reading on dead trees)

For 2018, we’re going to recommend our favorite ocean themed fiction, SciFi and otherwise.

  • A novel of finance, pirates, and the cutthroat world of the shipping industry: The Shipping Man by Matthew McCleery.

Derelicts (favorites from the deep archive)

Feel free to share your own Foghorns, Flotsam, Jetsam, Lagan, Shipping News, Driftwood, and Derelicts in the comments below. If you enjoy Southern Fried Science, consider contributing to our Patreon campaign. For just $5 per month, you can support the SFS Writers Fund, which helps compensate your favorite ocean science and conservation bloggers for their efforts.

Marine science and conservation. Deep-sea ecology. Population genetics. Underwater robots. Open-source instrumentation. The deep sea is Earth's last great wilderness.

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