Category Archives:

#OceanOptimism

Welcome to #JacquesWeek 2017!

#OceanOptimism, #SciCommJuly 21, 20170

Jacques Week begins this Sunday, July 23, 2017! Join us for a week of celebrating classic Jacques Cousteau Documentaries, discussing ocean science and conservation, and celebrating all things Big Blue! Most of these films are available online. Some will require purchase. We’ve provided links to the for-purchase options and alternates if you can’t find them. […]

The Jaunty Red Knit Cap.

#OceanOptimism0

How would they wear it? #JacquesWeek. Be there.  Hey Team Ocean! Southern Fried Science is entirely supported by contributions from our readers. Head over to Patreon to help keep our servers running and fund new and novel ocean outreach projects. Even a dollar or two a month will go a long way towards keeping our website online […]

#JacquesWeek returns July 23, 2017!

#OceanOptimismJune 27, 20170

I am pleased to announce that Southern Fried Science will once again host Jacques Week, an ocean lovers’ alternative to Shark Week. Three years ago, on a bit of a whim, we launched Jacques Week, an effort to not only provide a respite from the blood-in-the-water, often fake documentaries of the premier basic cable ocean […]

Help an ocean student catch a break!

#OceanOptimismMarch 6, 2017

The Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium (LUMCON), located at the very tip of Louisiana’s boot, is a special place. The only marine lab in Louisiana, LUMCON serves public universities and supports marine science for the entire state. I had the pleasure of visiting LUMCON late last year to lead an underwater robotics workshop for local high […]

Fun Science FRIEDay – Harnessing Synthetic Biology to Fight Ocean Pollution

#OceanOptimism, Conservation, Environmentalism, Fun Science Friday, marine science, Natural Science, Science, toxicologyDecember 16, 2016

Plastics, more importantly microplastics, clog our oceans. This phenomena in the ocean has been likened to smog around cities. These plastic particles are dangerous because they can absorb toxins, subsequently be consumed by zooplankton and invertebrates, and bioaccumluate up the food web to fish that are consumed by humans. A study in Nature found that 25 percent […]

Connect with SFS
  • Categorical Archives
    Chronological Archives
    Subscribe via Email

    Join 236 other subscribers