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Join us as we read and discuss a research paper every week! Introducing #SharkScienceMonday

Be sure to follow #SharkScienceMonday on twitter every Monday morning of 2018 (starting January 8th)! Each week, a team of researchers* will be discussing a different scientific paper related to shark and ray biology, behavior, ecology, or management.

Some papers will be new and cutting edge, while others will be classics. They’ll all have one thing in common: a member of the Dulvy lab thought that they had an interesting or important result that significantly contributed to our various areas of expertise. Whenever possible, we will share a link to an open access copy of the paper so everyone can read along.

After we summarize the key takeaways from each paper, we’ll take questions. We’ll also start a discussion about that specific paper and the discipline that it is a part of, including suggesting various experts you can follow on twitter.

We hope that you’ll follow along with us, and that you’ll learn some interesting and important things about elasmobranch research and management!

Things to note:

  1. Are these the “most important or influential papers in shark research and management?” No. They are some representative papers that we thought are interesting and important that cover a diversity of topics, from many parts of the world. Whether or not a paper is included in these discussions has no bearing on the actual relative importance of a paper.
  2. *Who picks these papers? The students, postdocs, and staff in the Dulvy lab! Please note that our lab is focused on evolutionary ecology, population/community ecology, and conservation, and our selection will gravitate towards these topics.
  3. I’m a shark researcher or management expert, can I host a week? Sure, e-mail me at WhySharksMatter at gmail and we’ll see if we can set something up. This would be particularly helpful if you’re an expert in a discipline other than those we study (listed above)
  4. Can I nominate a paper for y’all to discuss? Sure, e-mail me at WhySharksMatter at gmail. Bonus points if your paper comes from a discipline other than what we study.