Science in the Fleet: What would your hometown look like with 80 meters Sea Level Rise

UPDATE: These posts, and the hashtag are getting a lot of attention, so I’d like to reiterate, Caveat Tweetor (twitter beware) — these models are being generated on the fly as request come in. They are not validated and there are many variables that influence sea level rise which are not taken into account. This is a fun way to visualize potential sea level rise but it would be inadvisable to use it for real estate speculation. 

The central conceit in the world of Fleet–my dystopian maritime science fiction serial adventure–is that sea level has risen 80 meters, an extreme maximum projection under global climate change prediction (INSERT LINK TO USGS DATA HERE AFTER SHUTDOWN ENDS – UPDATE: Oh, neat, we have a federal government again. Here’s the source). Since 80 meters is pretty hard to visualize, I turned to Google Earth to help me simulate what our world would look like under those conditions, starting with my new residence in San Francisco:

FleetSanFran

San Francisco, 80 meters

Oh, but we’re not done yet.

Washington, DC, 80 meters

Washington, DC, 80 meters

Baltimore, 80 meters

Baltimore, 80 meters

New York, 80 meters

New York, 80 meters

Let’s zoom out a bit:

Bad News, Miami, 80 meters

Bad News, Miami, 80 meters

Good thing you outlawed sea level rise, North Carolina, 80 meters

Good thing you outlawed sea level rise, North Carolina, 80 meters

A view from the London Eye. 80 meters

A view from the London Eye. 80 meters

Sydney. Wet. 80 meters

Sydney. Wet. 80 meters

Port Moresby, Papue New Guinea. 80 meters

Port Moresby, Papue New Guinea. 80 meters

And I couldn’t resist my Planet of the Apes image!

Statue of Liberty, 80 meters

Statue of Liberty, 80 meters

Check out Fleet: The Reach and Fleet: Wide Open to experience a world in which people live with 80 meters of sea level rise.

  1. What about inland cities near lakes and rivers–St Louis, Chicago, Cleveland….?Thanks for doing this.

  2. fascinating stuff… you start this post with the phrase, “The central conceit in the world of fleet…” but I think you mean concept

  3. Seattle, WA is probably doomed. Also, Langley AF base should probably consider turning into a Navy one. How many meters required?

  4. “What about inland cities near lakes and rivers–St Louis, Chicago, Cleveland”

    Just remember that these cities would be unaffected, they are inland and above sea level elevation. Even all Great Lakes cities, will not see any rise as they’re at ~600′.

    Otherwise, very interesting

  5. Cool images, and I’m going to check out your serial. What’s your time frame for the 80-meter rise?

  6. Hey, kudos on the exposure! A couple years back I wrote a short story about the world after it rains for five straight years. That was how I got Denver underwater. It involved beaucoup research for such a short read (alien aquaforming using hydrogen from the sun, rainfall calculations, spherical volumes, etc.), and I wasn’t happy until I could say for sure exactly what was underwater and what wasn’t (from camps at the foot of Mt. Zion, survivors make foraging salvos 9 miles out to the top floors of Wells Fargo, Qwest, and Republic Plaza). So I found the .kml, tweaked it for the level I wanted, and voila. Just had to share, thought you might find it interesting. Good luck with the self-publishing!

    The Drowning World
    http://givethereaderswhattheywant.com/?p=895

  7. Ok, how about Portland, Me? We’re obviously right on the coast, but I wonder how far back toward the mountains I need to flee? Thanks.

  8. Now lets take this a do something practical. Lets pull 122 meters out of the oceans so people can see what he coastlines looked like at the peak of the last ice age.