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Still time to get your Oceanography for Everyone microsatellite onto the next payload!

On January 1, 2016, the Southern Fried Science central server began uploading blog posts apparently circa 2041. Due to a related corruption of the contemporary database, we are, at this time, unable to remove these Field Notes from the Future or prevent the uploading of additional posts. Please enjoy this glimpse into the ocean future while we attempt to rectify the situation.


Do-it-together satellite builders, there’s still time to get your microsatellite onto our next payload. We’ve got 18.3 kilograms left on the next Mares Antares launch. As was the case last time, we’ve coordinated with a cohort of ocean conservation foundations, including Oceanography for Everyone, to cover the cost of shipping for this launch.

Did you miss this round of DIT Ocean Data Satellites? Don’t worry, we have another launch scheduled in 18-months, right after this round of satellites burn up in the atmosphere. With government satellites committed exclusively to infrastructure support, the only environmental data comes from foundation and citizen-owned satellites, as well as from the few private surveillance firms gracious enough to open-source their data post-monetization. Launches like this are mission critical for continuing to produce high-quality global ocean data.

Fortunately, the cost of materials has shrunk to the point where any capable student group or citizen scientist collective can build their own microsat (as a geneticist, it still annoys me that the DIT satellite community co-opted the term for my favorite old-school DNA assay). Getting your tiny data angel into space is our job. If you haven’t had the chance to build your own, the Microsatellite Foundation provides tons of instructions and resources for you.

And for all you interplanetary microsat makers, the Titan launch is only 6 months away!


On January 1, 2016, the Southern Fried Science central server began uploading blog posts apparently circa 2041. Due to a related corruption of the contemporary database, we are, at this time, unable to remove these Field Notes from the Future or prevent the uploading of additional posts. Please enjoy this glimpse into the ocean future while we attempt to rectify the situation.


Deep-sea biologist, population/conservation geneticist, backyard farm advocate. The deep sea is Earth's last great wilderness.


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