Tag Archives:

biodiversity

Endangered turtles and fish venom: Thursday Afternoon Dredging, March 15, 2018

Thursday Afternoon DredgingMarch 15, 2018

Cuttings (short and sweet):  Follow marine conservation biologist Julia Spaet on twitter! Nearly half of freshwater turtles are at risk of extinction. By John Platt, for Revelator. Fishing bots “going dark” raise suspicion of illegal fishing. By Scott Neuman, for NPR. Ocean sensors can track progress on climate goals. By Joellen Russell, for Nature News. Spoils (long […]

The hunt for Soviet submarines, a 5-foot-long shipworm, the impossibilities of deep-sea mining, and more! Massive Monday Morning Salvage: March 5, 2018.

Monday Morning SalvageMarch 5, 2018

Foghorn (A Call to Action!) Subscribe to the Chesapeake Bay Journal (it’s free)! The venerable grey lady of the Bay survived the EPA’s attempt to defund them. Consider sending a few dollars to the journal, too. If you’re filing MD taxes this year, you can earmark some of you return to Chesapeake Bay programs. Flotsam […]

A year of brutal hurricanes, the wonderful resilience of limpets, talking about meat consumption, and more! The Monday Morning Salvage: December 4, 2017.

Monday Morning SalvageDecember 4, 2017

Flotsam (what we’re obsessed with right now) ‘Extremely Active’ 2017 Atlantic Hurricane Comes to a Close – Here’s the Full Season in One Four-Minute Video: The final news, for now, from the missing Argentinian submarine: Argentine Navy: Water Entered Missing Sub’s Snorkel and Argentina Abandons Rescue Mission for Missing Sub.

Nerds of trust, deep-sea mining, ocean art, and more! Monday Morning Salvage: July 3, 2017

Monday Morning SalvageJuly 3, 2017

Fog Horn (A Call to Action) Protect the Outer Continental Shelf! Last week, the president announced a plan to open up significant portions of the outer continental shelf for oil and gas exploration. Call you representative! The public comment period opens today and runs through August 17. We’ll have a template script prepped for your use […]

Half-safe, climate change, deep-sea mining’s last frontier, and more! Monday Morning Salvage: Junes 12, 2017.

Monday Morning SalvageJune 12, 2017

Fog Horn (A Call to Action) 27 National Monuments are under review by the Department of the Interior. Our Nation Monuments are our National Treasures. Don’t let them be sold to the highest bidder! Submit formal public comments on the DOI Monument Review and make your voice heard. Flotsam (what we’re obsessed with right now) Sand. […]

Thursday Afternoon Dredging: June 1, 2017

Thursday Afternoon DredgingJune 1, 2017

Cuttings (short and sweet): Watch how guitarfish pull their whole eyeball inside their skull instead of blinking (learn more about this here) Follow Norah Brown, a UBC graduate student studying ocean acidification’s influence on marine ecology, on twitter!  Dugong baby boom is good news for the Great Barrier Reef. By John Pickrell, for National Geographic.

Middle Earth could have been saved by the Endangered Species Act

biodiversity, Natural Science, Popular Culture, ScienceDecember 22, 2014

In a cave in the Lonely Mountain there lived a dragon. Not a gnarly, goblin-stuffed, slimy cave, filled with the bowels of orcs and fishy creepers, nor yet an empty, granite, echo-less cave with nothing in it to lie down on or horde: it was a dragon-cave, and that meant gold. At least it did, until a nasty band of poachers found Lonesome Smaug, […]

If fish evolved on land, where did they all go? Evolution and Biodiversity in the Ocean

Challenging the Conventional Narrative, evolution, Focus on Nuance, marine science, Natural Science, ScienceFebruary 8, 2012

When Carl Sagan described our planet as a “pale blue dot” he was invoking the fact that, despite being called Earth, our world is mostly Ocean. The surface of the Earth is a little more than 70% water and the ocean accounts for 98-99% of our total biosphere–the volume of the planet that can support […]

Biodiversity Wednesday: Under the Sea Ice

UncategorizedMarch 16, 2011

A few years back I attended a mid-field season gathering of researchers working on International Polar Year projects. We were lucky enough to have collected the marine biologists, recently returned from a short cruise out of Barrow, AK with the mission to describe the biota living on the underside of the sea ice that is […]