#JacquesWeek, Lionfish tax, coral that glows, accelerating climate change, and more! Monday Morning Salvage: July 10, 2017

Fog Horn (A Call to Action)

Flotsam (what we’re obsessed with right now)

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Seasteading, ivory diving, seabed mining, and more! Monday Morning Salvage: June 5, 2017

Fog Horn (A Call to Action)

Flotsam (what we’re obsessed with right now)

  • Seasteading. Ok, we’re not actually obsessed with Seasteading. What we are obsessed with are the increasingly convoluted proposals to create floating nations at sea (heck, I even wrote a novel or two about that). Fresh from the New Republic: Libertarians Seek a Home on the High Seas.

Courtesy of Seasteading Institute

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#IAmSeaGrant, Octopus Beats Dolphins, Deep-sea Mining, and more! Monday Morning Salvage: May 29, 2017

Fog Horn (A Call to Action)

Flotsam (what we’re obsessed with right now)

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Terraforming Mars on Earth, giant larvaceans, conservation jobs, and more! Monday Morning Salvage: May 8, 2017

Fog Horn (A Call to Action)

Flotsam (what we’re obsessed with right now)

Seabirds on Ascension Island. Photo by Clare Fieseler.

Jetsam (what we’re enjoying from around the web)

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Meteor hunters, deep divers, and ocean action! Monday Morning Salvage: April 3, 2017

Flotsam (what we’re obsessed with right now)

Jetsam (what we’re enjoying from around the web) Read More

#SciFund Returns – Muddy waters: coral health after storm events

#SciFund, a month long initiative to raise funds for a variety of scientific research projects, is once again upon us. Project leaders post a project description and an appeal for funds, and members of the public are invited to make small donations to projects that they deem worthy. Donations come with rewards such as access to project logs, images from fieldwork, your name in the acknowledgements of publications, among other possibilities. Many of these projects are marine or conservation themed. Once again, we’re highlighting some of our favorite marine science proposals. Please take a look at these projects and, should you so desire, send some financial support their way. If you do make a donation, let them know how you found out about their project and leave a comment (anonymous if you’d like) on this post letting us know.


Muddy waters: coral health after storm events

I am interested in how coral health might be impacted by poor water quality after short storm events. I will be looking at two bays on St. John, USVI. One bay is in the national park and has no upland development and the other bay has a lot of upland development (roads, houses, etc.) After storm events, I will be taking water samples to assess water quality and will also be assessing coral health. I will be looking primarily at Porites astreoides, a common Caribbean coral.  I will be transplanting adult and juvenile P. astreoides corals into each bay and look at their health after each storm event. Looking at juvenile corals is really important because studies show they are more vulnerable to poor water quality and they are the next generation of coral reefs. I will also look at some corals that naturally occur in each bay, to see if corals exposed to poor water quality in the past respond differently to storm events.

source

Brittney Honisch is a graduate students investigating how water quality affects coral health. Her research feeds directly into establishing water quality standards for protecting coral health in the Caribbean. As you probably know, we value baseline assessments and standardized methodology for conservation and managementHead on over to Brittney’s project page and send some rocket fuel her way!

Alien Invaders: coral pathogens

The following is a repost from the old Southern Fried Science WordPress blog. The original can be found here.

It was a story that could very easily have been written as science fiction. Gorgonian (sea fan) corals of the Florida coast were turning black and dying. The infectious culprit was something no one working on the reefs had encountered before. It was totally alien. The black rot spread across the Caribbean, decimating coral populations. By the time the contagion had been deduced, more than 50% of total sea fan tissue had been eradicated in the Florida Keys. It was one of the worst coral epidemics in recent history.

The culprit was indeed an alien, though certainly not extra-terrestrial. In fact, it was very terrestrial. Aspergillus sydowii, a globally distributed saprophytic soil fungus was the nightmare creature. Aspergillus causes a variety of diseases in humans and birds, but had not previously been recognized as a marine pathogen.

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