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#SciFund Challenge: Saving Hawaii’s Coral Reefs

#SciFund is a month-and-a-half long initiative to raise funds for a variety of scientific research projects. Project leaders post a project description and an appeal for funds, and members of the public are invited to make small donations to projects that they deem worthy. Donations come with rewards such as access to project logs, images from fieldwork, your name in the acknowledgements of publications, among other possibilities. Many of these projects are marine or conservation themed. Over the next week, we’ll highlight some of our favorites. Please take a look at these projects and, should you so desire, send some financial support their way. If you do make a donation, let them know how you found out about their project and leave a comment (anonymous if you’d like) on this post letting us know.


Saving Hawaii’s Coral Reefs

Levi Lewis is a graduate student interested in how humans activities alter the ecology, health, and resilience of habitat-forming species.  He has assembled an interdisciplinary team to study coral reef development around the island of Maui. Funding will be used to support travel, equipment, maintenance, and analysis.

 

You can check out Levi’s blog, accretinglife, where he discusses this project and his motivations in more detail. Go check out Saving Hawaii’s Coral Reefs and make a donation to help out a worthy project.


Deep-sea biologist, population/conservation geneticist, backyard farm advocate. The deep sea is Earth's last great wilderness.


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