There is 10,000 times more plastic in the deep sea than in surface waters.

deep sea, marine science, Natural Science, ScienceDecember 17, 2014 • 1~2 min read • 0

Ocean plastics is one of the most pernicious problems facing the ocean. One-time use plastics, which, ironically, can persist for thousands of years, often find themselves carried downstream, settling on our beaches, our coastlines, and in large aggregations within oceanic gyres. We’re still trying to cope with the extent to which plastics, and particularly microplastics–tiny […]

Andrew’s five favorite “new” ocean blogs

Blogging, ScienceDecember 9, 2014 • 1~2 min read • 2

Several years ago, the ocean blogosphere experienced a moment which can only be described as a Great Convergence. Numerous popular independent blogs, either seeking refuge from The Event, looking for a broader audience, or undergoing life transitions that made it impossible to maintain the high volume of new content, merged under the aegis of the Southern […]

Marine Ecology via Remote Observation: an update from #ROV2PNG

Life in the Lab, Natural Science, ScienceNovember 12, 2014 • 2~4 min read

Note: we’re home after an exceptional 3 weeks of work in Papua New Guinea. Sadly, the course was so intense that we weren’t able to produce updates during the program. Instead, please accept these time-shifted updates from #ROV2PNG. After more than a week of building robots, developing research proposals, presenting and defending their proposals to […]

FLEXIBLE MORALITY A PLUS: Adjunct. a story in three parts (and an assessment of that new social network).

BloggingSeptember 28, 2014 • 1~2 min read

WANTED: DISENFRANCHISED ADJUNCTS. TRAVEL THE WORLD. MEET INTERESTING PEOPLE. GET HEALTH INSURANCE. FLEXIBLE MORALITY A PLUS. There’s a new social network, called Ello. Since Amy and I (and sometimes David) teach a social media for environmental professionals course each spring, we’re pretty much committed to giving every nascent social network a fair trial, which means that […]

The next era of ocean exploration begins in Papua New Guinea

Blogging, Citizen Science, ecology, marine science, Natural Science, Science, Science Life, Social ScienceSeptember 22, 2014 • 1~2 min read

In 1946, Jacques Yves Cousteau and Émile Gagnan released the Aqualung, forever changing the way humans interact with the oceans. No longer tethered to the surface, entombed in thick, restrictive helmets, we could dive deeper, stay down longer, and explore the dark places snorkelers and free divers feared to fin. The Aqualung opened up the […]

Natural history needs more .gifs

Natural Science, ScienceSeptember 15, 2014 • < 1 min read

There’s something glorious about .gifs, the short video clips that proliferate across the internet. Not quite as demanding of commitment as a full video, slightly more than a still image. These mighty little loops of endless wonder can express joy, surprise, or disdain far better than their static counterpart. They are an artform unique to the […]

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